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Month: August 2019

energy medicine

Energy Medicine; Debunking the Myths

I can’t tell you how many times I have heard that there is no science behind energy medicine. There has been tons of research coming from David Feinstein, Ph.D. Dawson Church, Ph.D., Bruce Lipton, Ph.D., Dr. Joe Dispenza, Dean Radin, Ph.D., and many others, demonstrating the power of energy medicine. But despite this, there are still many who seem glued to the idea that energy medicine is not evidence based.

One of the leading contributors to this myth is Wikipedia. Many of its arguments used to claim there is no science to support energy medicine come from the lab of one researcher, Edzard Ernst, Ph.D.  Plus the latest study to make that claim was from 2008.  Research in energy medicine has grown exponentially since then.

Many Alternative Medicine practitioners consider Wikipedia to be biased. A librarian I spoke to from Bastyr University said that they had repeatedly tried to get Wikipedia to update its pages on a variety of methods they practice, but Wikipedia isn’t allowing them to contribute to what is on their pages. I’ve heard similar stories from researchers in energy medicine.

The claim that Wikipedia is an encyclopedia that anyone can edit is simply not true.

Western medicine is not receptive to ideas outside of its own

As I wrote in my article What to Say to the Skeptics of Energy Medicine, being an expert can cause you to be closed to alternatives. Having spent 15 years in Western medical research in Neuroscience, neuro and nutritional epidemiology, and in alternative medicine, I can vouch for this with my own experience. If someone had told me in my 30s that I would be an energy practitioner two decades later, I would have given them a giant eye roll.  For most of my life I scoffed at using magnets for healing, and crystals. But I’ve been slowly exposed to their benefits over the years, and now I am grateful for their benefits and use them regularly.

The biases in Western medicine are well known to alternative practitioners

The danger in this lack of openness shows up with what journals choose to publish. For example, in 2008, I wrote the first review article on brainwave entrainment. It was a well-written paper that showed its profound benefits. Having been used to publishing in quality mainstream medical journals, I was determined to get their attention with this article. But journal after journal told me that they were not interested in reviewing my paper, and that it belonged in an alternative medicine journal.

The most prominent and well-used index of research is called PubMed. It is widely believed that only journals that are listed in PubMed produce quality research. In PubMed, at the time of my publication, there was only one journal accepting alternative medicine and research. I finally had to publish my paper there, where only people interested in alternative medicine saw it.

There are many alternative medicine journals that are not indexed in PubMed. We are often told that the journals that haven’t been accepted into PubMed are of poor quality. But it is extremely difficult to conduct quality randomized controlled trails with methods that are dependent upon the unique symptoms, or makeup of the individual. For example, in functional medicine, a client will receive a variety of tests to determine the underlying causes that need to be addressed. Thus the treatment will depend on the results of these tests. So should methods that are tailored to the individual be required to have the same research qualifications as a method that uses the exact same intervention for everyone?

Around 2008 NPR reported that a lab at Harvard had discovered a new technique called neurofeedback. I almost choked. The field had been around for at least 20 years! I had attended classes in neurofeedback, and knew that there was an entire journal, conferences, and hundreds of practitioners who already practiced the technique. But it wasn’t until Harvard ”discovered” it, that it was considered by Western medicine to be something worth looking at.

There is an implicit assumption that the pharmaceuticals administered in Western medicine are evidence-based

I recently learned in a class I took from Angelo Pezzote, Pharm. D., M.A., who is a board-certified pharmacist that pharmaceutical companies are only required to do 2 randomized control trials with a minimum of 30% efficacy to bring a drug to market! And that is for new drugs. This paper from BMC Medicine suggests there are many older drugs on the market that don’t meet the criteria for 30% efficacy.

I was shocked when I heard these numbers. If what I did only had 30% efficacy I wouldn’t have chosen to dedicate my life to it. Personally I aim for 100% efficacy. I don’t have complete control over what my clients choose to do, or whether they will give it the time needed to reverse their condition. However, for the vast majority of conditions that people come to see me for, I am able to completely eliminate the problem.  I’m horrified that 30% is the standard required for pharmaceuticals, especially given the standards they require for alternative medicine.

Plus with Western medicine’s reputation for side effects, 2 randomized control trials is not enough. Did you know that less than ½ of trials that are started are actually published? Plus there are wide discrepancies about the negative effects of the drugs between the government database of trials and what gets published.

There is also widespread off-label use of medicines. In other words, a physician may notice a drug seems to help a condition where no trials have been conducted. There is also not enough understanding of how drugs might interact. Finally, drug trials are not done in sensitive populations such as children and the elderly, where they are widely administered.

Claims that energy healing could be dangerous: Debunked!

A great way to tell the safety of a practice is to look at their malpractice insurance costs.

Costs in Western medicine:

  • A psychiatrist pays between 6-30K/yr
  • A family practice physician pays between: 8-50K/yr
  • A Neurosurgeon pays between: 50-150K/yr
  • An energy practitioner pays 0.25K/yr
      • 0.25K = $250/yr.

Why is the insurance of energy practitioners so low? Because what we do isn’t dangerous, and clients are almost always happy with their experience. I regularly tell clients that what I do is safer than crossing the street!

“Energy medicine is purely a placebo effect” : Debunked!

Many energy practitioners practice with animals, and some (like myself) do it long distance. The notion that the placebo effect explains long-distance animal healing is preposterous. I’ve helped feline clients resolve litter box issues, and get along with their feline housemates long distance. I’ve helped a newborn puppy that had severe hypoglycemia, seizures and a fear of eating not only survive, but thrive long distance. Animals communicate via energy, and know when they are being helped. But given their lack of comprehension of the human language, we can’t assume it was because of something anyone said to them.

From personal experience, I’ve tried many things (including the methods I now use) that I had no idea if they would work. For example, I was looking into the power of Nikken magnets. My colleague insisted that I try the sleep system. Given that I wasn’t aware of having sleep issues, I didn’t expect to notice anything. Yet the next morning, I felt like I had just come out of a week-long meditation retreat. I couldn’t believe how relaxed and at peace I felt, and how that serenity stayed with me through the morning, even after my car wouldn’t start.   Usually my modus operandi would be to panic, I was more than stunned by its effects! No one had ever suggested that I would respond that way, so how could it be a placebo effect?

If we can’t predict the results, how is it a placebo effect?

Many clients come to me unsure about whether I can help them. They are regularly amazed by what is possible.  Once in awhile, I do have clients who claim to notice no benefits. When this is true, I find that they have a similar belief in everything they try. When I release the beliefs that are getting in the way of them seeing the benefits of anything they do, they start to see how effective my methods are.

Often times clients will come to me with issues I’ve never addressed, and I can’t tell them that what I do will help. If they feel like they are out of options otherwise and want to give what I do a try, I get to find out again what is possible with the method I use.  It’s a new experience for both of us, thus therefore any positive results I get cannot be a placebo effect.  While I haven’t been able to reverse symptoms for everyone who has seen me, my success rate is well over 90% for the issues I address.

A refusal to pay attention to the evidence

Meanwhile over 600 studies have been published in PubMed in the field of energy medicine. In the field of Energy Psychology alone, as of August, 2018, over 100 research studies were published in peer reviewed journals, including four meta-analyses and five review articles.

Here is the evidence worth noting: The studies include 50 pre-post trials and 50 randomized controlled trials.   98 out of these 100 studies showed effectiveness! These results are stunning to anyone who’s spent much time looking at the effectiveness of interventions. Yet they are not a surprise to those of us who practice energy medicine. You can read more about the latest research in energy psychology at the Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology website.

Its time to let go of the myth that there is no science behind energy medicine. Given how safe and effective energy medicine is, it is my preferred go-to intervention for chronic conditions. If you have never tried it, I suggest approaching it with an open mind. Check out a local healer’s fair to get a sample of different healing modalities. If you live in the Pacific Northwest, you can check out the Metaphysical Empowerment and Wellness Fairs here.

Do you have a health issue that you’d like to let go of? Book a complimentary consultation to learn more what is possible when I apply my unique approach to using the Body Code. Join hundreds of satisfied clients and get your life back! You deserve to have the health and life you love!


Collective member Dr. Tina Huang is a Holistic Brain Health Practitioner who uses the wisdom of the subconscious to identify and release the underlying causes of concerns in health, wealth, relationships and happiness. Due to her extensive training in Neuroscience and Epidemiology, she’s passionate about identifying root causes in order to prevent mental and cognitive health challenges.

Love Through the Mess

My toddler is having a melt down while I am changing my kicking, crying infant’s full diaper. As Grayson is jumping around to avoid my swatting, he hits my elbow then nearly plants his foot in the motherload resting on the ground by my knee. I start to lose it.

Who is this tyrant I gave birth to? What the hell is wrong with him? My normally calm voice breaks into a feverish mom voice. Like a boiling pot with a lid on, irrational things start to escape from my mouth. Some of them might be swear words. I start to threaten this small maniac. I sound kinda crazy.

And like that, a lifetime of training goes down the tubes. Mindfulness? Staying centered and grounded? Not today.

I begin to feel urgently that those with anger management issues should NEVER be parents. No one but my three year old has ever elicited this sort of rage from me. And he is a truly great kid.

Less than an hour later, the diaper is clean and Grayson is sitting happily drawing.

He’s perfectly fine. And I am still pissed. I feel harried, frazzled, tired, resentful and messy. I have not brushed my teeth or combed my hair and we need to get to preschool.

In some variation or degree, this is a weekly, if not daily experience for me. Even as I’m writing this, I can feel the pent up anger in my chest and the heaviness of the shaming voice saying “why don’t you have this figured out yet?! You’re supposed to be a teacher.”

I rack my brain for a mantra, a practice, a yoga pose that will help me stay calm through the chaos of my children, help me be a parent that’s a little more like Mr. Myagi, or like Buddha. But nothing seems all-encompassing enough for this….

…And then last night as I was closing up my computer, out of things to write (I did not come up with a mantra ) I recalled a conversation I had on Easter Sunday with my brother in law. He shared something he had heard his pastor say that morning. He said,

“The world is messy right now. Our job is simply to love through the mess.”

I was thinking it sounded like a great blog post but it did not occur to me until last night to apply it to my own little life. What if we could stop trying to fix things and just love?

What if I could stop trying to control my kids, running after Grayson with the vacuum, cringing every time he eats toothpaste? Just love him more, and perhaps more to the point, love myself more. Stop trying to “get it right”.

As I consider this idea of “loving through the mess”, my chest literally relaxes. It feels warm. My jaw softens.

Then I start to wonder….can I actually begin to love the mess itself? And then I realize, I already do.


Camron Momyer is a Reiki Therapist and Intuitive Healer based in Seattle, WA. By accessing more joy and less worry, she helps others easily step into their life purpose. You can learn more about her and book a remote reiki session on her website, www.soulsourcedenergy.com

 

#LoveThroughtheMess #love #selflove

postpartum doulas are a new mother's dream come true

Postpartum Doula; The Support Every New Parent Needs

When I tell people that I’m a Postpartum Doula and the responsibilities that entails, I hear far too often – “Where were you when I needed you?”. While both birth and postpartum doulas have been around for quite some time, Postpartum Doulas have more recently gained popularity. 

The Role of a Postpartum Doula

The definition of a Postpartum Doula is as follows: A postpartum doula is a professional support person trained in the needs of the family in the days, weeks and months after birth or the addition of a new baby. The doula offers non-judgmental support, guidance, evidence-based education, and practical hands-on support immediately after birth through the first year. Doula originates from the Greek word meaning woman servant.

The period after birth is what we call the “Fourth Trimester”. This is a time period where not only is the newborn adjusting to life outside of the womb, but the adults caring for them are also transitioning into a new role. The postpartum period looks different for everybody and the role I play as their doula during this stage varies based on each individual need. The ultimate goal is to help not only the mother but the family unit as a whole foster maximum self-determination. My role is not to do everything for them, but instead support them so they have the confidence to know they CAN do it on their own.

 

mother & baby

During this period, there are prominent aspects that I give specific attention to. These include: emotional support, physical comfort of the mother, self-care, infant care, education, partner support, sibling support, referrals, and household organization. Though I focus on each of these aspects with every client, my role as their doula looks different for each one. I must assess their specific needs depending on their individualized preferences and provide evidence based information for the mother to make the best informed decision regarding what is best for herself and her baby. 

Anything outside my scope of practice requires a referral, as doulas are not medical professionals. This includes having a rolodex of professionals including certified lactation consultants, postpartum therapists, physical therapists specializing in women’s reproductive systems including before, during and after labor into the postpartum period, among many others. 

As their doula, my focus is on “mothering the mother”, meaning I ensure that self-care is foremost, especially if a new mother has had a cesarean section. Proper nutrition, rest, and fluids are top priority. I am a companion, always there to listen in a non-judgmental environment and ready to provide resources, referrals and options to decrease feelings of worry/concern, stress, and segregation from life before they gave birth. 

postpartum doulas support mothers & their babies

Why Work with a Postpartum Doula?

Women have been nurtured and cared for since the beginning of time from various individuals including family, neighbors, and friends. There are numerous benefits that come from being supported by a Postpartum Doula, much like the support for those in your tribe. Mothers and partners do not feel so alone and gain confidence with the help of a doula, as the doulas role is to affirm that these individuals are right on track. Showing your confidence in them allows them to grow more confidence in themselves and trust the decisions that they are making. 

Having a Postpartum Doula assists not only in instilling confidence but also helps the parent truly understand their newborn. The first 5-7 days are an extreme roller coaster, with hormonal changes and body recovery, all the while getting to know a new member or members of the family. I help those caring for the newborn learn how to interpret cries, body language, reflexes, and those super sweet baby sounds that occur. With wisdom and gentleness, as your Postpartum Doula, I am able to guide you through this journey! 

A Day (or Night) in the Life of a Postpartum Doula

Doulas work around the clock because let’s face it, newborns do everything on their own terms. They eat when they want, they sleep when they want, and we are there to make sure they are happy! Every single day and every single shift is different. Many doulas choose to work minimum 3-4 hour shifts, though I work as little or as much (up to 8 hours) as my client desires. I chose to provide my shifts in 60 minute increments due to no limitations on self-care. If a new mother is having some anxiety about leaving her newborn but just really wants to get a pedicure, I am there. If she wants to take a nice, long, hot shower and know her newborn is well cared for, I am there. If she just wants to enjoy a coffee alone, I am there.

 

I always check in with a client before arriving to see if there is anything they need me to pick up for them. Some place grocery orders and I pick them up on the way, some simply want an iced latte. Some have medication that they have not been able to pick up, and some simply say no thanks. First two things I always do upon arrival is remove my shoes and wash my hands. 

Depending on the needs of the client, a typical shift consists of A LOT of baby wearing. Sometimes I wash bottles and fold laundry while wearing the baby. Sometimes I simply sit and listen to my client talk about their fears and concerns while bouncing on a medicine ball with their newborn in my arms. Active listening is the key, as you are there solely for them, to guide them, to support them, to listen to them, to validate their feelings and concerns. 

Sometimes, the mother just gives me a few instructions and cannot wait to leave for a few hours! I wash a lot of bottles, fold a lot of baby clothes, and get spit up on A LOT! I show new mothers how to engage their baby to properly open their mouth for a successful latch when they are having breastfeeding issues, I place breastmilk into baggies and properly label them and wash pumping supplies. I support new mothers who are having difficulties breastfeeding and refer them to some amazing certified lactation consultants.

Working an overnight shift means a lot of newborn snuggles! I love working overnight shifts, the main reason being I know how exhausting it can be and being able to provide support for new parents in the form of getting uninterrupted sleep is priceless. Whether it be snuggling a newborn all night who will not sleep otherwise, to feeding and changing them on cue, to light household chores that do not cause a disruption; overnight shifts are very rewarding. The most rewarding part is when morning comes and one or both of the parents look well rested and are beyond elated that they got more than two hours of sleep without having to get up. 

Becoming a Postpartum Doula has been one of the best decisions I’ve made. It is far beyond just a career. Nothing compares to knowing you are making a difference in the lives of others at their most vulnerable times. These individuals invite us Doulas into their lives and their homes, and in turn, we provide them with invaluable support that allows them to be the best they can be.


Wendy Quast is a Postpartum Doula and the founder of Seattle Day Doula. She has over twenty years of hands-on childcare experience and received her postpartum certification from Bastyr University. Interested in working with Wendy? Book visits using this link or send an email to admin@seattledaydoula.com